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  • All the taxes you cannot see

    All the taxes you cannot see0

    • January 9, 2017

    by Jon Caldara Seeing is believing. So, it’s no wonder many in government prefer to work in the dark. It’s not just that they don’t want us to know what they’re fully doing. They don’t want us to know what we’re fully paying. The reason for this emotional manipulation is clear. If the cost of

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  • Two Decades of Colorado’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR)

    Two Decades of Colorado’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR)0

    • May 23, 2016

    Over two decades have passed since Colorado voters adopted The Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights in 1992. TABOR allows government spending to grow each year at the rate of inflation-plus-population. Government can increase faster whenever voters consent. Likewise, tax rates can be increased whenever voters consent. This Issue Paper analyzes TABOR’s effect on state government spending and taxes by examining three decades: The 1983-92 pre-TABOR decade; the first decade of TABOR, 1993-2002; and the second decade, 2003-12. The final decade included the largest tax increase in Colorado history, enacted as Referendum C in 2005. Decade-2 was also marked by increasing efforts to evade TABOR by defining nearly 60% of the state budget as “exempt” from TABOR.

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  • Who Pays Colorado Taxes?

    Who Pays Colorado Taxes?0

    • September 16, 2015

    Linda Gorman writes about the 38 percent increase in Colorado state spending.

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  • Aurora Food Tax Changes Respect TABOR Restriction0

    • August 7, 2012

    The City of Aurora amended its sales tax regulations related to candy and soft drinks, as a response to concerns raised by Aurora grocery retailers. The 2012 ordinance amendment has the appearance of a tax increase but further analysis concludes the tax policy change is likely to be “revenue neutral,” And therefore does not require voter approval under TABOR.

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  • Why Colorado Should Shift to a Defined Contribution Retiree Health Plan0

    • September 28, 2010

    By Barry W. Poulson, Ph.D. Colorado taxpayers are on the hook for more than $1 billion in unfunded liabilities incurred in the defined benefit retiree health plan administered by the Public Employee Retirement Association (PERA). An additional $79 million in unfunded liabilities was incurred in 2008, reflecting both a rapid growth in retiree benefits and

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