Quantcast
728 x 90
728 x 90
728 x 90
728 x 90
728 x 90



  • An Analysis Of Proposition 1030

    • March 19, 2012

    Colorado’s Proposition 103 will raise state taxes $532 million in the first year and about $2.9 billion in the first five years. It proposes to raise the income tax rate on individuals and families, as well as small businesses, and simultaneously to raise the state sales tax rate. Proposition 103 is the only state issue on this fall’s ballot.

    READ MORE
  • How Colorado’s Tax Burdens Rank Nationally0

    • February 8, 2012

    Residents of Colorado should know how their tax burden compares with Americans throughout the nation. Colorado ranks 26th nationally, compared to all other states for the combined state and local tax burden, on a per capita basis.

    READ MORE
  • Government Loans Bring Trouble0

    • January 16, 2012

    by Harris Kenny Solar panel-maker Solyndra has been in the headlines because it received $528 million worth of taxpayer-backed federal loans and then went bankrupt. But Denver residents don’t need to look at failed Solyndra to see the trouble that government loans can bring. Sadly, there are some prime examples closer to home. Last month,

    READ MORE
  • Prop 103: What Is The Cost To Colorado Taxpayers?0

    • October 19, 2011

    by Barry Poulson In November, Colorado citizens will vote on Prop 103 to increase taxes and earmark the revenue for education K-12. Prop 103 increases the personal income tax, the corporate income tax, and the statewide sales and use tax for the years 2012 through 2016. The Fiscal Impact Statement prepared by the Colorado Legislative

    READ MORE
  • Proposition 103: What is the Cost to Colorado Taxpayers?0

    • October 16, 2011

    Proposition 103 is an initiative that will increase Colorado tax rates and require the state to spend the money on government schools. Prop 103 increases the personal income tax, the corporate income tax, and the statewide sales and use tax for the years 2012 through 2016.

    The Fiscal Impact Statement prepared by Colorado’s Legislative Council Staff estimates the cost of the tax increase at $2.9 billion. However, the cost for Colorado taxpayers will be significantly greater than staff estimates. Legislative Council uses static analysis, measuring only the direct impact of the higher taxes on state revenue. They ignore the negative impact the tax increase will have on economic growth and jobs in Colorado.

    READ MORE
  • Colorado Bridge Enterprise: A Case Study in Contravening Colorado’s Constitution0

    • May 8, 2011

    In 2009 the General Assembly passed Senate Bill 09-108, more commonly known as FASTER. Signed by Governor Bill Ritter, the bill relies on distortions and deliberate misdirections to subvert Colorado’s Constitution and silence the voice of the people. The bill depends on continued silence for its provisions to move forward. Under FASTER, Colorado families are being forced to pay an unconstitutional tax of almost $100 million annually. This tax hits everyone who registers a vehicle in the state squarely in the pocketbook—a tax that was enacted directly by the legislature without a vote of the people.

    READ MORE