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  • Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less (Part 2)0

    • October 25, 2013

    More spending does not create better schools. Many well-funded districts have lower graduation rates. Colorado Springs spent $1,500 less than Denver. It graduated 76 percent of its students, while Denver only graduated 46 percent. If passing Amendment 66 lets Denver spend $4,000 more, it might end up matching Indianapolis’s 30 percent graduation rate.

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  • Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less0

    • October 10, 2013

    IB-G-2013 (October 2013) Author: Linda Gorman PDF of full Issue Backgrounder Introduction: Amendment 66 will take the money you spend to benefit your children and give it to public education bureaucrats. Education bureaucrats do not necessarily use higher funding to benefit children. They will spend it on things that they like – generous pensions, higher

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  • The Colorado Government Pension System Introduction and Basic Organization0

    • April 22, 2013

    Colorado’s Public Employee Retirement Association (PERA) is the State’s largest pension plan, with more than 483,000 members as of 2011. Government contributions exceeded $1 billion in FY2011.

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  • A Thumbnail Guide to Colorado State Government’s Spending Problem0

    • February 26, 2013

    Colorado state government has a spending problem. Although inflation-adjusted per capita personal income in Colorado is still below its 2003 level, state spending has risen every year since 1999. State tax revenue has risen, but it cannot keep up with the spending.

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  • Aurora Food Tax Changes Respect TABOR Restriction0

    • August 7, 2012

    The City of Aurora amended its sales tax regulations related to candy and soft drinks, as a response to concerns raised by Aurora grocery retailers. The 2012 ordinance amendment has the appearance of a tax increase but further analysis concludes the tax policy change is likely to be “revenue neutral,” And therefore does not require voter approval under TABOR.

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  • An Analysis Of Proposition 1030

    • March 19, 2012

    Colorado’s Proposition 103 will raise state taxes $532 million in the first year and about $2.9 billion in the first five years. It proposes to raise the income tax rate on individuals and families, as well as small businesses, and simultaneously to raise the state sales tax rate. Proposition 103 is the only state issue on this fall’s ballot.

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