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Signing_of_Constitution_Chandler_Christy_smThe Constitutional Studies Center combines careful, objective scholarship into the original understanding of the Constitution with advocacy for human freedom under law. It produces books, issue papers, articles, and legal briefs reporting the results of its research. Since 2010, the Center has had enormous influence on constitutional law cases and commentary, but also on policy makers and grass roots activists. For example, the Center’s research findings galvanized the massive and growing “Article V” movement to restore constitutional limits on the federal government.

Latest Posts

  • Count of Legislative Applications for a Balanced Budget Amendment0

    • February 10, 2013

    by Rob Natelson The following states have applications outstanding for a federal convention to propose a balanced budget amendment: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Texas. That’s 19 of the 34 states required. In addition, Illinois has an 1861

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  • New Flyer Explains How the States Can Use the Constitutional Amendment Process to Curb the Feds (Article V)0

    • February 10, 2013

    by Rob Natelson The Founders built various checks and balances into the Constitution. One of the most important was the power of state legislatures to propose constitutional amendments to curb an abusive federal government. The Founders placed the procedure in the Constitution’s Article V. The Founders would be astonished—and chagrined—to learn the process has never

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  • The Myth of the “Conservative Supreme Court”0

    • January 19, 2013

    Is the current U.S. Supreme Court conservative? No, it is not. And certainly not if you define “conservative” as interpreting the Constitution according to the understanding of the makers. The claim that the Court has a conservative majority is certainly widespread. Googling the phrase “conservative supreme court” turned up over 38 million hits. The more

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  • Can the President Raise the Debt Limit Unilaterally? Hell no! — Part II0

    • January 11, 2013

    The claim—partly silly, partly dangerous—that President Obama may raise the debt limit unilaterally without the approval of Congress is again being raised. I addressed it previously here. Now it has been further debunked in a Wall Street Journal op-ed authored by David B. Rivkin and Lee A. Casey. Under the Constitution, only Congress may incur

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  • Boehner Admits Mistake: Sometimes the Constitutional Course is the Wisest Politically0

    • January 7, 2013

    In a December 23 post, I pointed out that House Speaker John Boehner should not be conceding the initiative on revenue measures to the Senate and President. Doing so not only made no political sense, but it was contrary to the Constitution’s mandate that revenue bills originate in the House. Mr. Boehner now agrees that

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  • A Response to Professor Seidman0

    • January 4, 2013

    Should we acknowledge that the U.S. Constitution is filled with “archaic, idiosyncratic and downright evil provisions,” and “extricat[e] ourselves from constitutional bondage” by cashiering the document? “As the nation teeters at the edge of fiscal chaos, observers are reaching the conclusion that the American system of government is broken,” argues Louis Michael Seidman, tasked with

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Get the latest edition of the popular work, The Original Constitution: What It Actually Said and Meant. You can buy it in either hard copy or Kindle form here.

Contact

Rob Natelson, Senior Fellow, Constitutional Jurisprudence
Email: rob.natelson1@gmail.com
Phone: 303-279-6536, ext 114

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